Post –Op Instructions

Home Care After Receiving a Composite Filling

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Several hours after your appointment, your lips and tongue may be numb because of the anesthetic used. Do not eat or drink a hot beverage until all the numbness has subsided so you do not accidentally bite your lip, tongue or cheek.

For a few days, the tooth with the filling will usually have heat, cold and pressure sensitivity. The injection sites for the anesthetic shots will also be sore. To alleviate the pain, we recommend taking ibuprofen, acetaminophen or aspirin as directed on the bottle.

As with any procedure, if your pain or sensitivity persists, or if you have any questions, please call our office.

Home Care After Receiving a Crown or Bridge

Usually it takes more than one appointment to give a patient a crown or bridge. At the first appointment, your mouth is anesthetized so our doctor can prepare and file down your teeth that need the restoration. While the permanent, custom crown or bridge is being made, our doctor will place a temporary crown or bridge in order to protect your teeth. After this first appointment, your lips and tongue will be numb because of the anesthetic used. Do not eat or drink a hot beverage until all the numbness has subsided so you do not accidentally bite your lip, tongue or cheek.

If your temporary crown falls off, please call our office immediately. Bring the temporary crown with you to the office, and we will re-place it on your tooth. To ensure the temporary crown stays on, do not eat sticky or hard foods or chew gum.

For a few days, the tooth with the temporary crown will have heat, cold and pressure sensitivity. These sensitivities should subside a few weeks after the permanent crown is placed. To alleviate the pain in the meantime, we recommend taking ibuprofen, acetaminophen or aspirin as directed on the bottle.

As with any procedure, if your pain or sensitivity persists, or if you have any questions, please call our office.

Home Care After a Tooth Extraction

After a tooth extraction, a blood clot usually forms in the extracted tooth’s socket to stop bleeding and to protect the exposed jaw bone. If the clot becomes dislodged or does not form, the site is called a dry socket, which is usually painful. If you have a dry socket, please call our office immediately. Usually, a medicated dressing will be placed on the dry socket by our doctor until the healing process can begin.

To stop bleeding after an extraction, place a piece of gauze over the socket and apply firm biting pressure for 45 minutes to an hour. Applying pressure for this extended period of time should stop the bleeding. If not, contact our office immediately.

Once the bleeding has stopped and a clot has formed, do not suck on straws, smoke, drink alcohol or brush the teeth next to the socket for up to 72 hours afterward, as these actions will disturb the blood clot. Also, do not vigorously exercise for the next 24 hours after the extraction.

To alleviate the pain and reduce swelling, we recommend applying an ice pack. You may also take ibuprofen, acetaminophen or aspirin as directed on the bottle.

After 24 hours, it is important to resume your normal brushing and flossing routine.

As with any procedure, if your pain or sensitivity persists, or if you have any questions, please call our office.